DIGITAL LITERACY AND USE OF INFORMATION COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY UL FACULTY AND STAFF SURVEY


July 2020

This survey was conducted to generate feedback from the Faculty and Staff of the University of Liberia relating to their use of Information Communications Technology and their Computer Related Literacy.  The information gathered will be a great asset in the continuing drive by the Office of Information Technology and the Teaching and Learning Center to keep our UL family in the know-how of the technological advances that permeates the halls of all institutions of higher learning.  Most importantly, as the premier institution of higher learning in the Republic of Liberia, it is imperative that the University of Liberia leads the efforts to bring the highest level of technological advancements into Liberia.

PART ONE:  UL FACULTY AND STAFF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT

The first part of this survey generated feedback on the UL Faculty and Staff knowledge of:

  1. a) Computer Keyboarding; b) Word Processing; c) Electronic Spreadsheet; d) PowerPoint Presentations; e) Database Management;  and f)  Desktop Publishing
  1. Computer Keyboarding: The survey results indicated that only 18% of our UL Faculty and Staff claim to be experts with using the keyboard of the computer.  The survey results indicated that 44% of the UL Faculty and staff claimed to have intermediate skills with using the keyboard of a computer while 39% of the UL Faculty members claimed only basic skills with using the keyboard of a computer
  2. Word-processing Knowledge (Microsoft Word, etc): The survey results indicated that only 21% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using Microsoft Word and other word-processing programs while using the computers and 47% claim to have intermediate skills.  There were 28% who claimed only basic skills and 4% who claim to have no knowledge at all about Microsoft Word and other word-processing software programs for use on the computer.
  3. Electronic Spreadsheet Knowledge (Microsoft Excel, etc): The survey results indicated that only 7% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using Microsoft Excel or other electronic spreadsheet programs while using the computers and 40% claim to have intermediate skills.  There were 28% who claimed only basic skills and an alarming 25% who claim to have no knowledge at all about Microsoft Excel and other electronic spreadsheet programs for use on the computer.
  4. Presentation Skills (Microsoft PowerPoint, etc): The survey results indicated that only 19% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using Microsoft PowerPoint or other presentation programs while using the computers and 40% claim to have intermediate skills.  There were 30% who claimed only basic skills and 11% who claim to have no knowledge at all about Microsoft PowerPoint and other presentation programs needed for making reports or presentations of their research work to a general audience using the computer.
  5. Databases (Microsoft Access, etc): The survey results indicated that only 2% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using Microsoft Access or other database management software needed to organize and analyze data while using the computers and only 12% claim to have intermediate skills.  There were 37% who claimed only basic skills and an alarming 49% who claim to have no knowledge at all about Microsoft Access or any other database management programs needed to organize and analyze data on the computer.
  6. Desktop Publishing (Microsoft Publisher, etc.): The survey results indicated that only 7% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using Microsoft Publisher or other publication software needed to publish reports while using the computers and only 11% claim to have intermediate skills.  There were 42% who claimed only basic skills and an alarming 40% who claim to have no knowledge at all about Microsoft Publisher or any other software program used to publish reports or other important documents while using the computer.

SUMMARY

The results indicated that at least 40% of our UL Faculty & Staff claimed Intermediate Knowledge of Computer Keyboarding, Word-Processing skills, Electronic Spreadsheets and Presentation skills, whereas at least 40% of them claimed None at All skills with Databases and Desktop Publishing.

PART TWO:  UL FACULTY & STAFF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT

The second part of this survey generated feedback on the UL Faculty and Staff knowledge of:

  1. a) The UL Online Registration Portal; b) The UL Web Site; c) The UL Faculty Network; d) The UL’s Student Wi-Fi Network; and e) The UL’s Acceptance Use Policy
  1. The UL Online Registration Portal: The survey results indicated that 16% of our UL Faculty and Staff had expert knowledge of the UL Online Registration Portal and 35% claimed to have intermediate knowledge of it.  There were 30% who claimed only basic knowledge and 11% who claimed to be novice about it while 9% of the UL Faculty and Staff claimed to have no knowledge of the UL’s Online Registration Portal.
  2. The UL Website: The survey results indicated that 26% of our UL Faculty and Staff had expert knowledge of the UL’s Website while 32% claimed to have intermediate knowledge of it.  There were 35% who claimed only basic knowledge and 2% who claimed to be novice about it while an additional 5% of the UL Faculty and Staff claimed to have no knowledge of the UL’s Website.
  3. The UL Faculty Network: The survey results indicated that only 12% of our UL Faculty and Staff had expert knowledge of the UL Faculty Network while 32% claimed to have intermediate knowledge of it.  There were 47% who claimed only basic knowledge of the UL Faculty Network while 9% of the UL Faculty and Staff claimed to have no knowledge of the UL Faculty Network.
  4. The UL’s Student Wi-Fi Network: The survey results indicated that only 5% of our UL Faculty and Staff had expert knowledge of the UL’s Student Wi-Fi Network and only 7% claimed to have intermediate knowledge of it.  There were 19% who claimed only basic knowledge and 23% who claimed to have be novice about it while an alarming 46% of the UL Faculty and Staff claimed to have no knowledge of the UL’s Student Wi-Fi Network.
  5. The UL’s Acceptance Use Policy: The survey results indicated that only 4% of our UL Faculty and Staff had expert knowledge of the UL’s Acceptance Use Policy and 19% claimed to have intermediate knowledge of it.  There were 40% who claimed only basic knowledge, 18% who claimed to be novice of this policy and 9% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about the UL’s Acceptance Use Policy.

SUMMARY

The results indicated that close to 70% of our UL Faculty & Staff claimed Basic and Intermediate Knowledge of the UL Online Registration, the UL Website and the UL Faculty Network, whereas 46% claimed No Knowledge of the UL Student Wi-Fi network and 40% claimed Basic Knowledge of the UL’s Acceptance Use Policy.


PART THREE:  UL FACULTY & STAFF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT

The third part of this survey generated feedback on the UL Faculty and Staff knowledge of How To:

  1. a) Browse the Internet; b) Perform Research on the Internet; c) Use Online Journals; d) Use Emails to Communicate; and e) Use the Internet to Teach.
  1. Browse the Internet: The survey results indicated that 40% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts at browsing the internet for information of all types and 33% claimed to have intermediate skills.  There were 23% who claimed only basic skills at browsing the internet and 4% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about browsing the internet to gain information.
  2. Perform Research on the Internet: The survey results indicated that 33% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in performing research on the internet and 35% claimed to have intermediate skills in using the internet to conduct research.  There were 21% who claimed only basic skills and 11% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using the internet to perform research.
  3. Use Online Journals: The survey results indicated that 21% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using online journals to keep informed about world-wide academic affairs and 23% claimed to have intermediate skills in the use of online journals.  There were 39% who claimed only basic skills and 18% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using online journals to receive academic or educational information.
  4. Use Emails to Communicate: The survey results indicated that 54% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in using emails to communicate with each other and 32% claimed to have intermediate skills.  There were 12% who claimed only basic skills and 2% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using emails to communicate with others.
  5. Use the Internet to Teach: The survey results indicated that only 9% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts using the internet to teach their classes while 30% claimed to have intermediate skills in using the internet to teach.  There were an alarming 30% who claimed only basic skills and 32% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using the internet to teach their classes at the University of Liberia.
  6. Use the Internet for Entertainment: The survey results indicated that 18% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in using the internet for entertainment purposes and 33% claimed to have intermediate skills in using the internet for entertainment purposes.  There were 40% who claimed only basic skills in using the internet for entertainment purposes and 9% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using the internet for entertainment purposes.

SUMMARY

The results indicated that a high number of our UL Faculty & Staff claimed Expert or Intermediate Knowledge for Browsing the Internet (73%); Performing Research on the Internet (68%) and Using Email to Communicate (86%). Whereas 62% claimed Basic or No Knowledge at all for Using the Internet to Teach and 57% claimed Basic or No Knowledge at all for Using Online Journals.


PART FOUR:  UL FACULTY & STAFF KNOWLEDGE ABOUT

The fourth part of this survey generated feedback on the UL Faculty and Staff ability to use the tools of Technology like: a)  Computers; b) Tablets and Laptops; c) Scanners; d) Servers; e) Smartphones; f) Projectors; and g)  Printers.

  1. Using Computers: The survey results indicated that 19% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in using Computers as technology tools and 46% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using Computers as technology tools.  There were 32% who claimed only basic knowledge and 4% who claimed to have none or no knowledge at all about using the Computer as a technology tool at the University of Liberia.
  2. Using Tablets and Laptops: The survey results indicated that 28% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in using Tablets and Laptops as technology tools and 39% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using Tablets and Laptops as technology tools.  There were 30% who claimed only basic knowledge and 4% who claimed to have none or no knowledge at all about using the Tablets and Laptops as technology tools.
  3. Using Scanners: The survey results indicated that 21% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be experts in using a scanner as a technology tool and 30% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using a scanner.  There were 32% who claimed only basic knowledge about using a scanner as a technology tool and 18% who claimed none or no knowledge at all about how to use a scanner as a technology tool.
  4. Using Servers: The survey results indicated that only 4% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be experts in using a server as a technology tool and 16% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using a server as a technology tool.  There were 35% who claimed only basic knowledge about using a server as a technology tool and an alarming 46% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed none or no knowledge at all about how to use a server as a technology tool.
  5. Using Smartphones: The survey results indicated that 39% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be experts in using the smartphone as a technology tool and 32% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using the smartphone.  There were 26% who claimed only basic knowledge about using the smartphone as a technology tool and 4% who claimed none or no knowledge at all about how to use the smartphone as a technology tool.
  6. Using Projectors: The survey results indicated that 16% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be experts in using the projector as a technology tool and 33% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using the projector.  There were 37% who claimed only basic knowledge about using the projector as a technology tool and 14% who claimed none or no knowledge at all about how to use the projector as a technology tool.
  7. Using Printers: The survey results indicated that 26% of our UL Faculty and Staff were experts in using printers to generate hard copy materials for their work and 40% claimed to have intermediate knowledge about using printers to generate hard copy materials for their work.  There were 26% who claimed only basic knowledge about using printers and 7% who claimed to have no knowledge at all about using printers.

SUMMARY

The results indicated that a high number of our UL Faculty & Staff claimed Expert or Intermediate Knowledge of Computers (65%); Printers (66%); Tablets and Laptops (67%) and Using Smartphones (71%). A good number of them claimed Expert or Intermediate Knowledge of Scanners (51%); Whereas 70% of them claimed Intermediate to Basic knowledge of using Projectors there were 70% who claimed Basic or No Knowledge at all of Servers.


COMMUNICATIONS WITH EACH OTHER AS UNIVERSITY OF LIBERIA FAMILY MEMBERS

The survey investigated the important concept of Communications with each other in the UL family using tools such as a) Emails; b) Text messages; c) Video Conferencing; d) Chatrooms; e) Social Media; f) Telephones and g) Internal Memos.

PART ONE:  UL FACULTY MEDIUM OF COMMUNICATION

  1. Using Emails: The survey results indicated that 21% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Emails 100% of the time, while 40% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Emails (99-85)% of the time.  There were 18% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Emails (84-50)% of the time and 9% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Emails (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Emails to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  2. Using Text Messages: The survey results indicated that 19% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Text Messages 100% of the time, while 30% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Text Messages (99-85)% of the time.  There were 26% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Text Messages (84-50)% of the time and 11% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Text Messages (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 14% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Text Messages to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  3. Using Video Conferencing: The survey results indicated that 4% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Video Conferencing 100% of the time while 16% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Video Conferencing (99-85)% of the time.  There were 23% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Video Conferencing (84-50)% of the time and 33% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Video Conferencing (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 25% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Video Conferencing to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  4. Using Chatrooms: The survey results indicated that 12% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Chatrooms 100% of the time while 21% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Chatrooms (99-85)% of the time.  There were 30% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Chatrooms (84-50)% of the time and 21% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Chatrooms (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 16% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Chatrooms to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  5. Using Social Media: The survey results indicated that 12% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Social Media 100% of the time while 28% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Social Media (99-85)% of the time.  There were 25% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Social Media (84-50)% of the time and 25% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Social Media (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 11% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Social Media to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  6. Using Telephones: The survey results indicated that 33% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Telephones 100% of the time while 44% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Telephones (99-85)% of the time.  There were 9% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Telephones (84-50)% of the time and 7% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Telephones (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 7% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Telephones to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.
  7. Using Internal Memos: The survey results indicated that 23% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Internal Memos 100% of the time while 30% of our UL Faculty and Staff claimed to be in communication with each other using Internal Memos (99-85)% of the time.  There were 25% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Internal Memos (84-50)% of the time and 11% who claimed to be in communication with each other using Internal Memos (49-10)% of the time. Lastly, there were 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff who claimed to use Internal Memos to communicate with each other at most 9% of the time.

SUMMARY

Survey results revealed that at least 85% of the time the UL Faculty communicated with each other using Telephones (77% of faculty), and by Emails (61% of faculty), by Internal Memos (53% of faculty) and by Text Messages (49%). However, less than 50% of the time was spent by Faculty Members communicating with each other by Video Conferencing (58% of faculty).


UL FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS USED FOR COMMUNICATIONS

  1. UL Email Address (University of Liberia): The survey results indicated that 40% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the UL Email Address to communicate with each other all the time and 18% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the UL Email Address to communicate with each other some of the time.  There were 33% of the UL Faculty and Staff who used the UL Email Address to communicate with each other when required and 9% of the UL Faculty and Staff who never used the UL Email Address to do any communications.
  2. Gmail Email Address (Public): The survey results indicated that 25% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the Gmail Email Address to communicate with each other all the time and 42% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the Gmail Email Address to communicate with each other some of the time.  There were 26% of the UL Faculty and Staff who used the Gmail Email Address to communicate with each other when required and 7% of the UL Faculty and Staff who never used the Gmail Email Address to do any communications.
  3. Yahoo Email Address (Public): The survey results indicated that 9% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the Yahoo Email Address to communicate with each other all the time and 16% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the Yahoo Email Address to communicate with each other some of the time.  There were 25% of the UL Faculty and Staff who used the Yahoo Email Address to communicate with each other when required and 51% of the UL Faculty and Staff who never used the Yahoo Email Address to do any communications.
  4. Hotmail Email Address (Public): The survey results indicated that 2% of the UL Faculty and Staff used the Hotmail Email Address to communicate with each other some of the time.  There were 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff who used the Hotmail Email Address to communicate with each other when required and 86% of the UL Faculty and Staff who never used the Hotmail Email Address to do any communications.
  5. AOL Email Address (Public): The survey results indicated that 7% of the UL Faculty and Staff  used the AOL Email Address to communicate with each other when required and 93% of the UL Faculty and Staff never used the AOL Email Address to do any communications.

SUMMARY

When Faculty members communicated with each other by emails, the survey results indicated that 67% of the faculty members preferred to use the public email system of Gmail Always or Sometimes.  However, there were 58% of the Faculty members who used the University of Liberia email system Always or Sometimes.


UL FACULTY FAMILIARITY WITH LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

  1. Moodle LMS: The survey results indicated that 42% of the UL Faculty and Staff said Yes to having used the Moodle LMS in their classroom while 9% said No to having used the Moodle LMS in their classrooms.  A total of 37% of the UL Faculty and Staff said they had “somewhat” used the Moodle LMS in their classrooms and 12% said they had never used the Moodle LMS in their classrooms.
  2. Blackboard LMS: The survey results indicated that 23% of the UL Faculty and Staff said Yes to having used the Blackboard LMS in their classroom while 30% said No to having used the Blackboard LMS in their classrooms.  A total of 30% of the UL Faculty and Staff said they had “somewhat” used the Blackboard LMS in their classrooms and 18% said they had never used the Blackboard LMS in their classrooms.
  3. Sakai LMS: The survey results indicated that 2% of the UL Faculty and Staff said Yes to having used the Sakai LMS in their classroom while 54% said No to having used the Sakai LMS in their classrooms.  A total of 9% of the UL Faculty and Staff said they had “somewhat” used the Sakai LMS in their classrooms and 35% said they had never used the Sakai LMS in their classrooms.
  4. Web CT LMS: The survey results indicated that 2% of the UL Faculty and Staff said Yes to having used the Web CT LMS in their classroom while 56% said No to having used the Web CT LMS in their classrooms.  A total of 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff said they had “somewhat” used the Web CT LMS in their classrooms and 30% said they had never used the Web CT LMS in their classrooms.
  5. Chamela LMS: The survey results indicated that 2% of the UL Faculty and Staff said Yes to having used the Chamela LMS in their classroom while 58% said No to having used the Chamela LMS in their classrooms.  A total of 2% of the UL Faculty and Staff said they had “somewhat” used the Chamela LMS in their classrooms and 39% said they had never used the Chamela LMS in their classrooms.

SUMMARY

The use of a Learning Management System in the classroom is relatively new at UL, hence when asked to list the LMS that most UL Faculty members were familiar with, only 42% claimed knowledge of Moodle and 23% claimed knowledge of Blackboard.  The majority claimed no knowledge of LMS.


TECHNOLOGY SKILLS UL FACULTY WANT TO KNOW

  1. Basic Technology Skills: The survey results indicated that 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that learning Basic Technology Skills was not a priority, and 16% said it was important to know. However, 72% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that learning Basic Technology Skills was the highest priority.
  2. Evaluating Websites & Using Online Resources: The survey results indicated that 11% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that evaluating Websites & Using Online Resources was not a priority, and 21% said it was important to know. However, 68% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that evaluating Websites & Using Online Resources was the highest priority.
  3. Creating and Maintaining Effective Websites and Blogs: The survey results indicated that 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Creating and Maintaining Effective Websites and Blogs was not a priority, and 19% said it was important to know. However, 68% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Creating and Maintaining Effective Websites and Blogs was the highest priority.
  4. Using Online Course Management Systems for Classwork and Homework: The survey results indicated that 10% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Using Online Course Management Systems for Classwork and Homework was not a priority, and 23% said it was important to know. However, 67% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Using Online Course Management Systems for Classwork and Homework was the highest priority.
  5. Using Data Analysis to Inform Classroom Instruction: The survey results indicated that 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Using Data Analysis to Inform Classroom Instruction was not a priority, and 23% said it was important to know. However, 65% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Using Data Analysis to Inform Classroom Instruction was the highest priority.
  6. Wikis as an Alternative to Textbooks: The survey results indicated that 8% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Wikis as an Alternative to Textbooks was not a priority, and 39% said it was important to know. However, 53% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Wikis as an Alternative to Textbooks was the highest priority.
  7. Email Communications: The survey results indicated that 29% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Email Communications was not a priority, and 18% said it was important to know. However, 53% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Email Communications was the highest priority.
  8. Presentation Software (MS PowerPoint, etc): The survey results indicated that 20% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Presentation Software (MS PowerPoint, etc) was not a priority, and 26% said it was important to know. However, 54% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Presentation Software (MS PowerPoint, etc) was the highest priority.
  9. Working with Digital Portfolios: The survey results indicated that 16% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Working with Digital Portfolios was not a priority, and 30% said it was important to know. However, 54% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Working with Digital Portfolios was the highest priority.
  10. Internet Safety Web 2.0 and Digital Citizenship: The survey results indicated that 16% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Internet Safety was not a priority, and 30% said it was important to know. However, 54% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Internet Safety was the highest priority.
  11. Electronic Spreadsheets (MS Excel, etc): The survey results indicated that 12% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Electronic Spreadsheets (MS Excel, etc) was not a priority, and 37% said it was important to know. However, 51% of the UL Faculty and Staff agreed that Electronic Spreadsheets (MS Excel, etc) was the highest priority.

SUMMARY

When asked to list the Technology Skills that UL Faculty Members want to know  with the Highest Priority the ranking order included: 72% for Basic Technology Skills; 68% for Evaluating Websites & Using Online Resources; 68% for Creating and Maintaining Effective Websites and Blogs; 67% for Using Online Course Management Systems for Classwork and Homework; 65% for Using Data Analysis to Inform Classroom Instruction; 54% for Internet Safety, Web 2.0 and Digital Citizenship; 54% for Working with Digital Portfolios; 54% for Presentation Software (MS PowerPoint, Presentation, etc); 53% for Communications (UL emails); 53% Using Wikis as an Alternative to Textbooks and 51% for Electronic Spreadsheet (MS Excel, Cal, QuickBooks):


 

_________________________________________________________________

The survey for this data was created by the UL Office of Information Technology (OIT) to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the overall technology environment within the UL community. This  data was collected and analyzed  by Dr. Emmett C. Dennis, the Executive Director of the UL Teaching and Learning Center with technical assistance from Mr. James Massaquoi of the College of Engineering who created the web version of the questionnaire for easy UL Faculty and Staff access using the KoBo Toolbox and served as the Administrator in the collection of the data on the web from July 20 to July 30, 2020.

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